Monday, June 27, 2005

A Marine's Wish List

In their weekly "Inside the Ring" column in the Washington Times, Bill Gertz and Rowan Scarborough printed a "wish list," from a Marine who recently returned from Iraq, Sgt. Garrett Barton. According to Sgt. Barton, a machine gunner who served in last fall's Fallujah offensive, Marines engaged in Military Operations in Urban Terain (MOUT) still lack essential training and equipment. Among his observations:

"A firefight in a MOUT environment against drugged-up insurgents is not the place to discover Pfc. Smith needs to work on his shoulder pressure and manipulation of the [testing and evaluation],"

"This is life and death. The average grunt is swamped with weight; Marines carry gear and ammunition that include flak jackets, Kevlar helmets, two ceramic plates, M-16s with seven magazines, grenades, radios, water, chow, night-vision equipment and more."

"Ounces equal pounds, and pounds equal pain;" This is not good when Marines need to move quickly in a combat situation, and the extreme weight reduces their fluidity."

"The M-16 is prone to jams; I can personally attest that I kept my weapon properly cleaned and lubed yet within ten minutes I had two jams ... in Al Fallujah; The M-16 round is "too fast, too small and too stabilized. It cannot compete with the 7.62 fired by Warsaw Pact weapons" such as AK-47s.

Sgt. Barton said he has never seen armor-piercing rounds for his M-240G medium machine gun.

"Our current enemies like to use [car bombs]. Personally, I would feel more comfortable shooting at a vehicle laden with explosives if I had armor-piercing rounds," he said.

Troops also need more powerful hand grenades. "The insurgents in Iraq like to inject themselves with adrenaline," Sgt. Barton said. "The casualty radius of our current grenades is insufficient."

Sgt. Barton concluded his "grunt wish list," which was sent to the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory in Quantico, Va., saying he tried not to be too critical, knowing current resources are limited. But he noted: "Any improvement is a big step in our capabilities."

A few thoughts (from an ex-Air Force guy). The limitations of the M-16 are well known, and the present weapon is at the limits of its technology? It's worth asking when we will finally replace the M-16s, and give our troops a better, more reliable weapon. On the issue of armor-piercing rounds for our machine guns, this type of technology has been around for decades; it should be standard issue for our troops, particularly those trying to stop vehicle-borne suicide bombers. Congressmen obsessed with prisoner menus and "flushed" Korans at Gitmo would be better served by tackling the problems listed by Sergeant Burton.

5 comments:

Clay said...

things that come to mind:

1) How hard is it for the armed forces to move to an AR-10 based force? The ergonomics and sighting systems are damn near the same, as is the maintenance. still the s**ts where it eats operation system, BUT....

2) AR-10s with piston-driven uppers??? Given the bulk buys I imagine, this ought to be VERY cheap as tweaks go.

2a) .308 FMJ would stop most vehicles. 308 with a tungsten core would stop a friggin' train engine!

3) bring back the pineapples! sometimes 'progress' sucks and this is one way that is proven true.

Oscarbravo1 said...

In your first bullet point, you have "testing and evaluation" for "t & e". That is wrong. The "T & E" is the "traversing and elevating mechanism" . It is what controls where the machinegun is pointing when attached to a tripod.

Secret Agent X-9 said...

There are some potential replacements for the venerable M-16 in the pipeline.

The Army is looking to replace the M-16, M-4 and M-29's with the new "XM-29" Objective Individual Combat Weapon (OICW).

Still fires a 5.56 but comes with air-burst grenades in an over / under arrangement. Damn thing is heavy though so they just put out a request for a lighter weapon and it looks like HK's "XM-8" contender might (read: probably) will be the winner.

Check it out: http://www.military.com/soldiertech/0,14632,Soldiertech_XM8,,00.html

Pierre Legrand said...

Looks like the Remington 6.8 might be the round of choice if the right politician gets the right amount of grease.

As I understand the issue using the .308 makes the weight issues harder to solve.

Pierre

Kirk said...

A couple of things.

Yes, there are shortages of different types of ammunition in theater. Two that I have heard of are AP 7.62 belted ammunition, and .50 ball (!) ammunition. From what I have heard, the major cause of the shortages are inadequate machines to manufacture not the cartridges themselves (think fat contracts for Winchester and/or Federal), but for the links. Apparently the available equipment is just about worn out.

What the hold-up is on the M-16/M-4 replacement is, I don't know. Apparently H&K was about ready to go to mass production with the M-8 (modified due to solder input), but DoD published a new requirement/competition. I am hoping that the new weapon will be chambered in 6.8mm, but no telling.