Friday, March 30, 2007

Ya Think?

From today's U.K. Times: "How Britons were conned by Iranian gunboat trick."

Speed and cunning shown by the Revolutionary Guards suggests that their action was premeditated.

And it only took a week for the Times to figure that out. Still, the paper is light-years ahead of the ultra-liberal Guardian. In an op-ed column that ran yesterday, Guardian columnist Ronan Bennett says that Iran's treatment of Seaman Faye Tunney is "wrong," but "not in the same league as U.S. and British abuses."

Wow. That's quite a feat of gymnastical logic. Comparing the detention (and interrogation) of suspected terrorists, legally captured on the battlefield by uniformed combatants, to the plight of British marines and sailors, taken illegally in international waters--while conducting a U.N.-sanctioned mission. Only a unber-leftist could come up with that sort of analogy. The New York Times must be jealous. Paging Bill Keller. I think we've found your next op-ed columnist.

2 comments:

Peter said...

There is something horribly sick about contemporary society when views such as the Guardians are as mainstream as they seem to be.

Here is a article from the BBC that seems to be blaming the US for the abductions.

Iran is now also militarily encircled by the US forces. American troops are based in almost every country bordering Iran - Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, Pakistan and Azerbaijan.

The US Navy has been conducting a series of exercises in the Gulf - the biggest war games in the area since the invasion of Iraq four years ago.

Hardliners are arguing that any release of the British sailors should be conditional on the release of five Iranians held by the US

The sense of being under siege is compounded by the US military's detention in January in Iraq of five Iranians.
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Spook86 said...

I'm waiting for the Iranians to demand the release of those "diplomats" and IRGC officers, captured in Iraq, as a condition for freeing the British sailors and Royal Marines.

The Beeb and the Guardian. What a combination.